Are you stuck staring at a horse’s rear-end?

horses

Are you stuck staring at a horse’s rear-end?

The U.S. standard rail gauge – the distance between the two rails of a railway – is exactly four feet, eight and one-half inches. A very odd measurement.

And why is that?

Because that’s the measurement they used to build the railways in England, and since it was the English expatriates who built the railroads in the United States, the same measurements that were used in England were used in the U.S. .

And why did the English build their rails with such odd measurements?

Because the same people who built the tramways (pre-railroad days) built their rails with a distance of exactly four feet, eight and one-half inches apart.

And why did the people who built the pre-railroad tramways build their rails with an exact distance of four feet, eight and one-half inches apart?

Because the tramways reused the same jig, tools, and measurements that had been used to build wagons, which used the same spacing between wagon wheels of exactly four feet, eight and one-half inches.

And why did the wagons have the spacing between wagon wheels of exactly four feet, eight and one-half inches?

Because if the spacing had been different, the wagon wheels would’ve broken on many of the old, long-distance roads in England…which incidentally had wheel ruts with the same spacing of four feet, eight and one-half inches.

And why were the old rutted roads built with the same spacing of four feet, eight and one-half inches?

Because the Imperial Roman Empire built the first roads in England thousands of years ago, and the ruts of these roads were spaced four feet, eight and one-half inches, because the Roman war chariot made the initial ruts.

And why did the Imperial Roman war chariots have roads that had ruts spaced four feet, eight and one-half inches apart?

Because the Imperial Roman war chariots were made just wide enough – four feet, eight and one-half inches – to accommodate the back end of two warhorses!

So let me get this straight.

The U.S. standard rail gauge of four feet, eight and one-half inches 

came from 

the rear ends of two warhorses? 

What a classic illustration of doing things because that’s the way we’ve always done things.

My Point:

If you’re stuck in a rut and you’re doing the same old things in the same old ways you’ve always been doing the same old things…

well, it may be time to stop staring at the back end of a horse’s rear-end.

It may be time for some changes, some new challenges, some new growth, some new ideas, some new habits, some new thinking, some new adventures, some new risk. It maybe time to get out of that four foot, eight and one-half inch rut and find a better view.

If I can help get you out of a rut

If I can assist you in finding and fulfilling your life’s purpose, I’d love to help:

Living Life With Purpose,

 

Ken L Roberts

* Material from the book, The Seven Decisions, by Andy Andrews, pages 102 – 103.

 

 

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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